Walls Coming Out Nicely.

Hoeheim Salvage Bootcamp is full of treasures

We started the salvage of this house being told it was built in the 1920 but I had my doubts as the style of the architecture was older. Turns out the house was too. We found cool things under the coverings of paneling, thin sheetrock, drop ceilings, and vinyl blinds. It was indeed built in the late 1800’s by the evidence we found, from the cast square nails, the paint colors, and the construction technique for example.
Look at the great pictures of the colors and the wood that appears after only a day of work.

The green Milk paint is by far the most popular of the colors these days and we found lots of it.  With a light sanding to expose the hard grain, this becomes a beautiful wood to work with.

The green Milk paint is by far the most popular of the colors these days and we found lots of it. With a light sanding to expose the hard grain, this becomes a beautiful wood to work with.

The grand hallway down the center had a lighter paint color on it.

The grand hallway down the center had a lighter paint color on it.

Hard to believe they covered this up with wall paper then later a drop ceiling.

Hard to believe they covered this up with wall paper then later a drop ceiling.

After the carpet is pulled from the attic rooms you can see the floor will be great too.

After the carpet is pulled from the attic rooms you can see the floor will be great too.

For the booze bottle collectors, here are some 1936 tax stamped bottles with good labels from the freshly post prohibition era.  Nice finds in the attic.

For the booze bottle collectors, here are some 1936 tax stamped bottles with good labels from the freshly post prohibition era. Nice finds in the attic.

The original front and back doors were stashed in the attic.

The original front and back doors were stashed in the attic.

Here is a great door in the attic for the closet.  Barn style and heavy.

Here is a great door in the attic for the closet. Barn style and heavy.

Here are some shots of the booty we brought home on the second day. Neal and Ken are helping with the unloading.

We brought back about 700 sq. ft. of t&g in a variety of colors.

We brought back about 700 sq. ft. of t&g in a variety of colors.

A few doors as well.

A few doors as well.

Brown, green beige, and natural colors.

Brown, green beige, and natural colors.

Some of the lengths are 18' long and in nearly perfect shape.  Heavier than you can imagine, some weigh over 30 lbs each.

Some of the lengths are 18′ long and in nearly perfect shape. Heavier than you can imagine, some weigh over 30 lbs each.

Neal is one of the guys in learning at our seminar.

Neal is one of the guys in learning at our seminar.

Found a stack of nearly 50 Cypress fence pickets under the house.  Only work to get them was pull them out and stack them.  Normally they would cost you $15 a piece as they are old growth Cypress and hand cut.

Found a stack of nearly 50 Cypress fence pickets under the house. Only work to get them was pull them out and stack them. Normally they would cost you $15 a piece as they are old growth Cypress and hand cut.

You can see LouBee, Ken, and Jerry in the shots, all interning and part of the seminar. They are tearing up a storm and we made great progress for the clean up and initial tear out of some of the wood.

It exposed the fact that unlike nearly every house I have taken down so far, this one only has 4×4 structural members in the walls and they are on 3′ or more centers. No wood could take that load these days as we now use soft immature wood instead.

Here is some of the possible 4,000 square feet of 5" tongue and groove that will come out of the house.

Here is some of the possible 4,000 square feet of 5″ tongue and groove that will come out of the house.

Doors, some thin, and some with original hardware still working aftter 120 years.

Doors, some thin, and some with original hardware still working aftter 120 years.

Look at the incredible wood grain on these pieces of flooring and walls.

Look at the incredible wood grain on these pieces of flooring and walls.

The second day we got down to really getting some wood out. Here are some of the shots, including Jerry’s demo of the kitchen cabinets.

Here you can see the giant 4x4's in the walls and the wide spacing.  Sure makes the tear out easier, especially with it all being square nailed.

Here you can see the giant 4×4’s in the walls and the wide spacing. Sure makes the tear out easier, especially with it all being square nailed.

Walls coming out nicely.

Walls coming out nicely.

Pitbull is pulling the ceiling tiles off so we can get to the wood.  Turns out to be a great dark green which is hard to find in Milk paint.

Pitbull is pulling the ceiling tiles off so we can get to the wood. Turns out to be a great dark green which is hard to find in Milk paint.

The pile grows but the guys are getting after the nail pulling now.

The pile grows but the guys are getting after the nail pulling now.

Ken is using the Nail Kicker to blast away at cleaning up the wood for transport.

Ken is using the Nail Kicker to blast away at cleaning up the wood for transport.

A view of the wind bracing in the walls after we have taken down the coverings.

A view of the wind bracing in the walls after we have taken down the coverings.

This house was built to last, and it has, over a 140 years and still solid.

This house was built to last, and it has, over a 140 years and still solid.

The kitchen was a later add on and you can see the difference in the quality.  This is much lower quality of construction that the first part of the house.

The kitchen was a later add on and you can see the difference in the quality. This is much lower quality of construction that the first part of the house.

Well, we got more done that day but we have been leaving after dark so I did not get the final pictures of our work. Off again and today will be amazing for its progress as the house comes apart and is prepared to build two or three in its place with all the parts.