Things You Can Do To Extend The Life Of Your Steps Include:

Super Easy porch stair set from quality salvage Vintage Wood scraps

Here is a great way to build a set of stairs for the front porch out of the small pieces of incredible 500 year old trees.

They come from the New Berlin Salvage Bootcamp in the form of what might normally get thrown away on a salvage job,

but we transformed them in a few hours to become the steps for the Arched Brownie, the Gingered Swan, and Helen’s Heaven.

It all starts with some pieces of 4×6 that are cut into 6 1/2″, 13 1/2″, and 21 1/2″ lengths, 4 of each, then 6 pieces of 2×6 40″ long,  and then a couple of 2×4’s to give it a bit of crossover strength.

That and about 150 nails and you are in business.  You can also add a handrail to it, which I may post the other portion to show that too in a bit.

 

Would you believe we are going to offer this whole wood package, precut to size?

Better yet if you want…assembled into the two sides and the top treads already pre-drilled and ready with the screws to put together and screw in to finish, paint with milk paint, oil, and put in front of your house porch if you like.

That means we can ship it or you could pick it up and take it home in your trunk or the back of a hatch back or pickup to put together quickly.  Any way you want it as a package or full made, but we also have some fancy models and the handrails to show you.

Hope you enjoy the pictures and if you have the wood and skills, I hope you can use this to create a great entrance to the dream house in your life, whether tiny or just small, I hope you build from salvage to help preserve this ball we call Earth.

These have yet to be sanded, oiled, or fancied up with a quick router run around the edges.

Still, it give you something to think about while we finish a couple today.

Front view of the steps using a standard 12" deep tread and a 40" wide model, the rise is 8" which is easy to change to 7" for those who like an easier climb.

Front view of the steps using a standard 12″ deep tread and a 40″ wide model, the rise is 8″ which is easy to change to 7″ for those who like an easier climb.

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Several life extending things you can do. One would be to soak the bottoms of the 4×6 posts in Tung Oil with 50% mineral spirits to soak it up high and then it will not suck up water as easily. two is to use other horrid tasting and more potent things like used oil from a diesel or car, nasty and not recommended, or three using roofing tar and painting the bottoms to seal them, also ugly and nasty but effective if you like black or white roof slop. Also, set them up on bricks or other rocks to keep them an inch or two above the soil and grass line so they do not sit in dirt or water to start. Keep them oiled as they start to suck up water and show swelling or preserve the tops with some great preservatives on the market. (not Thompsons, or Behr, but real stuff) If you do that, these could last you for a decade or more without any problems.
Front view carrying one up 23" into the air for the next step to be the porch at a typical 30" height.

Front view carrying one up 23″ into the air for the next step to be the porch at a typical 30″ height.

Side view of the finished steps, one of three we made in two or three hours time.

Side view of the finished steps, one of three we made in two or three hours time.

Start by cutting up some shorts from other shorts that would otherwise get thrown away, even though the wood is incredible.

Start by cutting up some shorts from other shorts that would otherwise get thrown away, even though the wood is incredible.

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Here are the supports up to the sides and treat above.  Use both functions rather than place this piece too low and not support the tread above and add to the structural integrity dramatically.

Here are the supports up to the sides and treat above. Use both functions rather than place this piece too low and not support the tread above and add to the structural integrity dramatically.

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end cuts on the parts that stick out to the front helps minimize clipping toes or shoes, as well as looking much better and catching less water to cause it to rot.

end cuts on the parts that stick out to the front helps minimize clipping toes or shoes, as well as looking much better and catching less water to cause it to rot.

Top view of the tread pieces laid out to nail.

Top view of the tread pieces laid out to nail.

This is a face board or spacer board that locks the front of the stairs together better.  It can act as a threshold, mud and dirt gap for scraping shoes.

This is a face board or spacer board that locks the front of the stairs together better. It can act as a threshold, mud and dirt gap for scraping shoes.

Cut your 2x4's to be the width of your support elements on the sides to lock them and keep from turning sideways.

Cut your 2×4’s to be the width of your support elements on the sides to lock them and keep from turning sideways.

6 treads cut from tight grain Long Leaf Pine with few if any knots to catch water.  These would ordinarily be from other short and thus less valuable pieces that would go for rafters and floor joists.

6 treads cut from tight grain Long Leaf Pine with few if any knots to catch water. These would ordinarily be from other short and thus less valuable pieces that would go for rafters and floor joists.

Simply set all of the treads to cover the front of each block with a 1/4" overhang to help limit water penetration.

Simply set all of the treads to cover the front of each block with a 1/4″ overhang to help limit water penetration.

Show them laid out before nailing.

Show them laid out before nailing, and how to fix a short block when the saw just cuts it too short… or at least that is what someone said.

Shows assembly prior to outer locking blocks being put on.

Shows assembly prior to outer locking blocks being put on.